Archive for the ‘News’ Category

16 September 2013

Kiwi communities join former All Blacks to plant 170,000 trees

Rugby and tree planting may seem an unlikely combination, but over the past three years they have come together in a spectacular way: the Living Legends project. 17 “Rugby Legends” including Sir Colin Meads, Sir Brian Lochore and Todd Blackadder have joined over 8,000 New Zealanders to plant 170,000 native trees throughout New Zealand.

Living Legends was established in 2011 to commemorate the Rugby World Cup. Across the country, 17 native planting sites were identified, each dedicated to a local Rugby Legend who was nominated by their rugby union. Sir Colin Meads says “The completion of the Living Legends project was a mighty effort and it has been a privilege for me to be part of such a worthy project.”

2013 was the final year of public planting events for Living Legends held around New Zealand in August and September. Project Manager for Living Legends, Devon McLean says “We’re thrilled with the support from our Rugby Legends and the local communities who have been actively involved in Living Legends planting days. Reaching the end of the project and planting 170,000 trees across the 17 sites is a huge achievement. A project of this scale will benefit New Zealanders for years to come. These plantings will enhance some of our most special parks and reserves all around New Zealand, each site chosen in conjunction with the Department of Conservation for its significant ecological value. These are places where we reflect, refresh and can escape the hustle and bustle of our daily lives. We’re very proud of our commitment to helping to restore New Zealand’s bio-diversity with our Rugby Legends.”

Living Legends will continue to manage each of the 17 planting sites for the next two years before they are officially handed over to the Department of Conservation, or in some regions, the local Council.

Living Legends is a joint venture of Project Crimson, a conservation charity with 23 years experience in community-based native restoration projects and The Tindall Foundation. Major sponsors are the Department of Conservation and Meridian Energy.

 

 

18 August 2013

Volunteers complete major conservation initiative for Hawke’s Bay Rugby Legend

On Saturday 17 August, 170 volunteers donned their gumboots to plant 3,000 native trees and shrubs at Napier’s Ahuriri Estuary.

This staggering achievement was part of the Living Legends project.  Living Legends is completing 14 regional projects during August, to reach a target of planting a total of 170,000 native trees throughout New Zealand.  The work follows on from 2011 when Living Legends was established to leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup.

Each region’s planting project is dedicated to a local “Rugby Legend”.  Ian MacRae was selected by Hawke’s Bay Rugby Union as the Hawke’s Bay Rugby Legend in 2011.

Unfortunately Ian, President of NZRU, could not attend the event this year as he was in Sydney with the All Blacks but kicked off the weekend’s planting event by planting a tree at the Estuary before he departed on Friday morning.  Ian said “Living Legends is a fantastic project that has brought together rugby and conservation.  It has been an absolute privilege to be selected as the local Rugby Legend and to contribute to a project that will make a difference to New Zealand for generations to come.”

Devon McLean, Project Manager for Living Legends, adds “Ian has been a wonderful local ambassador for the Living Legends project, and has gone out of his way to support us, he is a true legend of rugby in New Zealand.”

Ahuriri Estuary is an extensive estuary which is home to a wide diversity of shore birds.  With the formation of cycling and walking tracks it is becoming increasingly used for recreation. The Living Legends project has established over 10,000 plants in two areas providing security and habitat for wading birds along the farmland edge and re-vegetating the railway embankment.  Maintenance of the plantings that have been completed by Living Legends will now be handed over to the Department of Conservation.

Living Legends is a joint venture of Project Crimson, an environmental charity with 23 years experience in community-based native restoration projects and The Tindall Foundation.  Major sponsors are the Department of Conservation and Meridian Energy.

18 August 2013

Mid-Canterbury Rugby Legend completes major conservation initiative

On Sunday 18 August, Mid-Canterbury Rugby Legend Jock Ross joined 100 volunteers to plant 2,000 native trees and shrubs at Ashburton’s Harris Scientific Reserve.

This staggering achievement was part of the Living Legends project.  Living Legends is completing 14 regional projects during August, to reach a target of planting a total of 170,000 native trees throughout New Zealand.  The work follows on from 2011 when Living Legends was established to leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup.

Each region’s planting project is dedicated to a local “Rugby Legend”.  Jock Ross was selected by Mid-Canterbury Rugby Union as the Mid-Canterbury Rugby Legend in 2011 and spent Sunday morning at Harris Scientific Reserve mucking-in with volunteers from the community to complete the Ashburton planting project.

Jock Ross says “Living Legends is a fantastic project that has brought together rugby and conservation.  It has been an absolute privilege to be selected as the local Rugby Legend and to contribute to a project that will make a difference to New Zealand for generations to come.”

Devon McLean, Project Manager for Living Legends, adds “Jock has been a wonderful local ambassador for the Living Legends project, and has gone out of his way to support us.  To have him there this weekend alongside the local community for our final event was brilliant, Jock truly is a legend.”

The Harris Scientific Reserve is a highly valuable remnant of once extensive dry-land kanuka.  It has only been preserved through the willingness of the past landowner, Arthur Harris, and the efforts of the Ashburton Community Conservation Trust. Living Legends was keen to assist in the extension and restoration of this remnant because of its great scientific value and the commitment of the local community. A total of nearly 7,000 dry-land kanuka and associated species have been established by Living Legends and the maintenance of these plantings will now be handed back over to the Ashburton Community Conservation Trust.

18 August 2013

Taranaki Rugby Legend completes major conservation initiative

On Sunday 18 August, Taranaki Rugby Legend Ian Eliason and Mayor Harry Duynhoven joined 200 volunteers to plant almost 2,000 native trees and shrubs at New Plymouth’s Coastal Walkway.

This staggering achievement was part of the Living Legends project.  Living Legends is completing 14 regional projects during August, to reach a target of planting a total of 170,000 native trees throughout New Zealand.  The work follows on from 2011 when Living Legends was established to leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup.

Each region’s planting project is dedicated to a local “Rugby Legend”.  Ian Eliason was selected by Taranaki Rugby Union as the local Rugby Legend in 2011 and spent Sunday morning at the Coastal Walkway mucking-in with volunteers from the community to complete the Taranaki planting project.

Ian Eliason says “Living Legends is a fantastic project that has brought together rugby and conservation.  It has been an absolute privilege to be selected as the local Rugby Legend and to contribute to a project that will make a difference to New Zealand for generations to come.”

Devon McLean, Project Manager for Living Legends, adds “Ian has been a wonderful local ambassador for the Living Legends project, and has gone out of his way to support us.  To have him there this weekend alongside the local community for our final event was brilliant, Ian truly is a legend.”

Living Legends Taranaki planting location is host to the award-winning Te Rewa Rewa bridge which crosses the Waiwhakaiho River and provides access to the Te Rewa Rewa Reserve. This area is administered by the Te Rewa Rewa Management Committee which is a partnership between the Ngati Tawhirikura Hapu of Te Atiawa and the New Plymouth District Council.  The extension of the coastal walkway just beyond the spectacular Te Rewa Rewa bridge has benefited from Living Legends planting of over 10,000 plants in the area between the walkway and the sea. It is hoped the dense plantings will not only suppress persistent weeds but also help in the stabilisation of the fore-dune.  Maintenance of the plantings that have been completed by Living Legends will now be handed over to the Department of Conservation.

18 August 2013

Canterbury Rugby Legend completes major conservation initiative

On Saturday 17 August, Canterbury Rugby Legend Tane Norton, Christchurch Deputy Mayor Ngaire Button and Waimakariri Mayor David Ayers braved the rain and joined 65 volunteers to plant 3,500 native trees and shrubs at Christchurch’s Ōtukaikino Reserve.

This staggering achievement was part of the Living Legends project. Living Legends is completing 14 regional projects during August, to reach a target of planting a total of 170,000 native trees throughout New Zealand. The work follows on from 2011 when Living Legends was established to leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup.

Each region’s planting project is dedicated to a local “Rugby Legend”. Tane Norton was selected by CRFU as the Canterbury Rugby Legend in 2011 and spent Saturday at Ōtukaikino mucking-in with volunteers from the community to complete the Canterbury planting project.

Tane Norton says “Living Legends is a fantastic project that has brought together rugby and conservation. It has been an absolute privilege to be selected as the local Rugby Legend and to contribute to a project that will make a difference to New Zealand for generations to come.”

Devon McLean, Project Manager for Living Legends, adds “Tane has been a wonderful local ambassador for the Living Legends project, and has gone out of his way to support us. To have him there this weekend alongside the local community for our final event was brilliant, Tane truly is a legend.”

The Ōtukaikino reserve is a former grazing property that was recognised as having important biodiversity values and has been transformed into a wetland through collaboration between Lamb and Hayward Funeral Directors and the Department of Conservation. Living Legends is proud to have been able to bolster their effects through the planting of 10,700 natives over the last three years. Maintenance of the plantings that have been completed by Living Legends will now be handed over to the Department of Conservation.

Living Legends is a joint venture of Project Crimson, an environmental charity with 23 years experience in community-based native restoration projects and The Tindall Foundation. Major sponsors are the Department of Conservation and Meridian Energy.

18 August 2013

Volunteers complete major conservation initiative in North Harbour

On Saturday 17 August, 80 volunteers donned their gumboots to plant 4,500 native trees and shrubs at Long Bay Regional Park.

 

This staggering achievement was part of the Living Legends project. Living Legends is completing 14 regional projects during August, to reach a target of planting a total of 170,000 native trees throughout New Zealand. The work follows on from 2011 when Living Legends was established to leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup.

 

Each region’s planting project is dedicated to a local “Rugby Legend”. Buck Shelford was selected by North Harbour Rugby Union as the local Rugby Legend in 2011.

 

Unfortunately Buck could not attend the event this year as he was in Australia but said “Living Legends is a fantastic project that has brought together rugby and conservation. It has been an absolute privilege to be selected as the local Rugby Legend and to contribute to a project that will make a difference to New Zealand for generations to come.”

 

Long Bay Regional Park is a popular recreation area for Aucklanders, attracting over a million visitors a year with its sweeping beach which adjoins a marine reserve and contains stands of native forest. It’s home to a significant area of coastal forest with a canopy of pohutukawa, puriri, and taraire. The Living Legends plantings on this extensive wetland/pasture will complement the great efforts already undertaken by the Park’s community supporters. Living Legends is pleased to have contributed 14,000 plants to this very popular recreation area. Maintenance of the plantings that have been completed by Living Legends will now be handed over to Auckland Council.

 

Living Legends is a joint venture of Project Crimson, an environmental charity with 23 years experience in community-based native restoration projects and The Tindall Foundation. Major sponsors are the Department of Conservation and Meridian Energy.

 

 

24 June 2013

Rugby Legends to muck in for last year of Living Legends plantings

Rugby Legends such as Buck Shelford, Sir Brian Lochore and John Sturgeon will be donning their gumboots and planting trees alongside thousands of New Zealanders for the last year of Living Legends events in August 2013.

 

Living Legends is a community conservation project that was set up in 2011 to leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup. So far more almost 130,000 native trees have been planted across 17 locations throughout New Zealand. A total of 170,000 trees will be planted at the conclusion of this year’s events.

 

Each planting project is dedicated to a regional ‘Rugby Legend’ who was selected in 2011 by their provincial rugby union. These Rugby Legends are people who have made an outstanding contribution to rugby in New Zealand.

 

Devon McLean, Project Manager of Living Legends says that as well as celebrating rugby, the project will contribute hugely to conservation in New Zealand. “We’re very proud of our commitment to helping to restore New Zealand’s bio-diversity with our Rugby Legends. Living Legends was established as an opportunity for people to get involved in the restoration of native tree populations alongside Rugby Legends in their local community” says Devon McLean, Project Manager for Living Legends. “We look forward to reaching our target of 170,000 native trees being planted by the end of this year’s events”.

 

Planting events will take place in;

Northland, 1 September

North Harbour, 17 August

Rotorua, 18 August

Hamilton, 24 August

Taupo, 25 August

Napier, 17 August

New Plymouth, 18 August

Manawatu, 25 August

Wellington, 24 August

Punakaiki, 1 September

Christchurch, 17 August

Ashburton, 18 August

Dunedin, 25 August

Invercargill, 24 August

4 October 2012

Rugby Legends help plant over 120,000 native trees

17 Rugby Legends including Sir Colin Meads, John Sturgeon and Bryan Williams have joined over 6,500 New Zealanders to plant more than 120,000 native trees as part of the Living Legends project so far.

Living Legends is a community conservation project that was established in 2011 to celebrate and leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup.  It is a five year project that will eventually see 170,000 native trees planted throughout New Zealand. A staggering 129,140 native trees have been planted so far.

2012 is the second year of planting for Living Legends and 17 public planting events were held around New Zealand in August and September, each dedicated to a Rugby Legend from the region. Buller-West Coast Rugby Legend, John Sturgeon says “It has been a privilege for me to be part of such a worthy community involvement and I was delighted with the turnout of volunteers from the West Coast and Buller areas who gave their time to Living Legends for the local planting days in 2011 and 2012. It was also pleasing to see so many young school children participating and learning about the part they play in conservation.”

Project Manager for Living Legends, Devon McLean says “We’re thrilled with the support from our Rugby Legends who have been actively involved in Living Legends planting days with the local community. Reaching the 120,000 trees mark is a huge milestone. We’re very proud of our commitment to helping to restore New Zealand’s bio-diversity with our Rugby Legends.”

Living Legends planting events will return next year, with dates and locations to be announced in early 2013.

 

30 August 2012

John Sturgeon joins the locals to plant native trees in Punakaiki

Rugby Legend John Sturgeon joined forces with around 80 local volunteers to help plant 2500 native trees in Punakaiki on Saturday 25 August.

This effort was part of the Living Legends project’s West Coast planting day for 2012. Living Legends has been planting at the Punakaiki Coastal Restoration area and with the help of our volunteers and Rugby Legend John Sturgeon, we have now planted a total of 7500 native trees at the this site. 5000 were planted during Rugby World Cup in 2011 and 2500 in 2012.

John Sturgeon was selected as the West Coast Rugby Legend in 2011 and spent the day at Punakaiki mucking in with local volunteers from the community, including kids from Runanga School, planting native trees.

John with the full Rununga School team

Devon McLean, Project Manager for Living Legends says Mr Sturgeon has been a pleasure to work with.  “John Sturgeon has been a tremendous supporter of Living Legends.  Despite John being on a walking stick because of recent surgery to his knee he got stuck in and the kids loved having him there.”

John will return with Living Legends to continue planting at the Punakaiki Coastal Restoration area in 2013.

23 August 2012

Kiwis help plant over 100,000 trees as a legacy to Rugby World Cup

Thousands of New Zealanders have now helped to plant over 100,000 native trees as part of the Living Legends project.

Living Legends is a community conservation project that was established in 2011 to celebrate and leave a legacy of New Zealand’s hosting of Rugby World Cup.  It is a five year project that will eventually see 170,000 native trees planted through public planting events held every year. A staggering 110,350 native trees have been planted so far, with a further 18,000 to be planted this year.

There are 17 planting projects around New Zealand and each is dedicated to a Rugby Legend from the region.  These include rugby greats such as Sir Colin Meads, Buck Shelford and Todd Blackadder.

“Reaching the 100,000 trees mark is a huge milestone. We’re very proud of our commitment to helping to restore New Zealand’s bio-diversity with our Rugby Legends.  Living Legends was established as an opportunity for people to get involved in the restoration of native tree populations alongside Rugby Legends in their local community” says Devon McLean, Project Manager for Living Legends.  “We look forward to seeing the next 18,000 trees being planted over the next two weeks”.

Living Legends event 2012 in Taupo

Volunteers muck in at the 2012 Living Legends event in Taupo

There is still opportunity for people to get involved with a local planting project this year, with events to be held this weekend in Wellington, Punakaiki, Tauranga and next weekend in Otago, Southland, Manawatu and Waikato.

Living Legends is a joint venture of Project Crimson, an environmental charity with 22 years experience in community-based native restoration projects and The Tindall Foundation.  Major sponsors are the Department of Conservation and Meridian Energy.

 

Upcoming Events

The Living Legends Events are now all completed.